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Weekly Report from the Board Meeting at Holman Prison 4.27.16

Weekly Report from the Board Meeting at Holman Prison 4.27.16

Vernon Madison May 12th execution date remains active. Madison's attorney in February filed a motion seeking to stop his execution, saying Madison suffers "from significant cognitive decline, acute mental health disorders, and severe medical problems that render him incompetent to be executed." A Mobile County judge held a competency hearing for Madison last week in Mobile. "Mr. Madison cannot independently recall the facts of the offense he is convicted of or the previous legal proceedings in his case," the EJI brief states. "Mr. Goff reported that Mr. Madison was unable to recollect the sequence of events from the offense, to his arrest, to his trial and could not recall the name of the victim." Meanwhile you can continue to write the Governor and will find the Talking Points by clicking on: http://www.phadp.org/?q=alerts.  Our thanks to all who have already written!

One of the topics we discussed was the importance of supporting and working with other Alabama groups. This is especially important for our group whose Chairman and Board are on death row. Alabama New South Coalition is one of these groups which are very dear to our heart. It was the first group our executive director joined when she came to Alabama and she has been a member ever since. It would be an almost impossible task to list all the ties we have meanwhile developed to it, but perhaps it is enough to mention just one name: Senator Hank Sanders. It’s legacy is “Making A Change for the Better in our Lifetime.” Last week we received an open letter from ANSC asking members to step up to the plate with a special membership. Project Hope to Abolish the Death Penalty is proud to announce that it now holds an Achieving Membership. We would like to encourage others to also support this important organization.

A small compounding pharmacy in Oklahoma sold execution drugs for at least three Missouri executions. When investigators later inspected the pharmacy, they found “significant” problems, and it later defaulted on its bank loans. This is the kind of news that makes us wonder how much more has to happen before the death penalty finally comes to an end. And of course here in Alabama we have no idea where the state gets its execution drugs. Perhaps from an out of state compounding pharmacy just like the one mentioned above?
See you next week!
Esther